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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
but with the res ig make of rebekah brooks on tuesday, this is a story which will run for months if not years with police investigations, judicial inquiries, lawsuits and any number of other threats still piling up against the mpany. but it's a significant day. >> the president's press conference, global implications for europe and th united states and the rupert--upert murdoch case. >>> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: storyline. it's happening every day, all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. additional funding provided by these funders: and by bloomberg a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studiosn new york city, this is charlie rose. >> psident obama had a press conferen earlier th morning following five days of closed door meetings with top congressional leaders. at the news conference his third in three weeks the president continu
of the world" and "the sun" was a part of it. >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quite clearly that the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" lay fairly and squarely with senior management of that paper, which i assume that includes you. is that the case? >> i think -- i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was, that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together -- >> is that mr. murdoch senior? >> sorry, yes, rupert murdoch. yes. >> you wanted to say something else? >> no. sorry. >> when you were advising your staff that the paper was closing, during the private session, i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand on what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom, to explain the decision, clearly and quite rightly, the journalists on the "news of the world" who very honorable journalists who have been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for
of the world." >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" laid fairly and square leon the management of the newspaper, which would include you. is that the case? >> i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said is exactly how it was. it was a collective decision. we all talked together, and mr. murdoch was in with the board at the time, >> yes, rupert murdoch, yes. >> during the private session i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom to explain the decision, and clearly and quite rightly the journalists on the "news of the world" who are very honorable and journalists who will been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for a longtime and with great pride in their newspaper were very sad and baffled by management's decision to close the paper. what i was saying to them is that right now you may not be able to right at this moment understand why we've done it, but i thi
tell the house about the conversations she had about the bskyb bid with mr. murdoch and rebecca brooks? >> all the details of the meetings and explain all of the conversations were appropriate and she could ask the members of her party to be equally transparent. >> does the prime minister join me in hoping that this is the end of the ever increasing rise of misconduct by police officers across the country? >> the police have to have an operation, have to have a relationship with the media, both at the top level to communicate with the police's right to do strategically, and at the operational level to help them with crime. we have to try to make sure they do not have an inappropriate relationship. >> prime minister, have you ever mentioned the word "bskyb" in the presence of rebecca brooks? >> does not raise serious questions about how the previous limit operated that members opposite thought that it a prepared for the prime minister to be brief on police matters? and the e-mails that were released, didn't show how professional his chief of staff is? >> i thank my hon. friend for putti
his first in command, rebecca brook, was sort of toeing the appropriate line. so whether there's a cover-up there that reaches the highest levels of newscorp or whether it's just the head of a company where there are problems and he's trying to fix them as best he can, i guess we'll -- we may find out. we may not find out. >> some people seem to feel it's really that connection between the rebecca brook, the "news of the world" editor, formerly, and the power that she really had in politics. and david cameron's former assistant also having worked over at the paper. that there just seems to be this coziness that is making people uncomfortable. >> well, i mean, we have the same thing in washington frankly. there's been a lot of coziness over the years. the white house press corps and the -- and government at all levels. i think that's a problem when people live and work and depend on each other for their livelihood. as the press and powerful people do. but, you know, i think murdoch is probably -- may not be the person this hits. i mean, i wonder if there's -- if there's an equiv
to know about the relationship with a back of trucks. what did they talk about? -- rebecca brooks. >> news international has revealed e-mails. he authorized a huge payments to corrupt police officers. that would seem to constitute a criminal offense. he was a witness in the trial for the scottish politician. tom sheridan past him, did the news of the world's a corrupt police officers? he replied, not to my knowledge. four words but not require extensive explanation. his lawyer called on the police to investigate. >> when the company announced two days ago that he had offered up payments to police officers for information, he told the jury that he has no knowledge of payments to police officers. someone is misleading us. he has to answer a perjury charge and that is very serious. >> news international took the action simply not available to david cameron. faced with a scandal that threatens to infect the whole organization, rupert murdoch has taken a knife to his own awkward flesh. >> an extraordinary moment. the victim of its own hocking scandal. >> they are ending a 168-year- old title. >
of how these men and rebekah brooks allowed or created or allowed to exist a culture that these things could happen and they didn't know about it. >> and it was profound theater to begin with, and as you mentioned, a lot of questions we would still like answered. we'll see how that plays out, but in the middle of this theater, a subplot, if you will. somebody tries to pie rupert murdoch. describe the scene as you recall it and especially i would say a rather feisty defense of mr. murdoch by his wife. >> oh, i mean, well, we're watching from the back. the picture -- all of a sudden, the noise. you see this woman in pink launch herself, going to give somebody a right hook. you then see james murdoch get out the chair like this. now, at first i couldn't tell whether mr. murdoch sr. had been hit. you can then -- in later pictures if you look close, you can see the foam. more than one person suggested that, you know, this could have been a brick, it could have been, you know, nails, it could have been much more serious. you have to bear in mind if it had been anything like that, it wouldn't
and gave a full and sincere apology. >> rupert and james murdoch and rebecca brooks will be forced to appear here in a committee and grill eed closelily politicians who want answers as to how all of this activity went on. one of the people who will be interrogating rebecca brooks had some tough words for her. >> i think he was inevitable. rebecca brooks has given the resignation message she should have given on day one of this scandal when nick davis of the uk "guardian" revealed milly's phone had been hacked. >> but the political dimensions continue to evolve as well. downing street has been forced to put out a list of guests that the prime minister david cameron welcomed to his country residents checkers. mo among them was the now disgraced former editor of "the news of the world." a man hired as director of communications. he visited the prime minister three months after he was forced to step down from that high profile political role. wolf? >> dan rivers in london, much more on this story coming up later. meanwhi meanwhile, libyan rebels locked in heated battle while gadhafi's
was a part of it. >> thank you. >> jim sheridan. >> miss brooks. rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quitely that the responsibility for the closure of news of the world fell fairly and swearly on senior management which i assume would include you, is that the case? >> i think i missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was. that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together. >> murdoch senior? >> yes, rupert murdoch. >> you were going to say something snels. >> no. >> when you were advising your staff the paper was closing during the private session. i think you said something like there was more to come. youl you like to expand? >> when i went down to the newsroom to explain the decision, clearly and and quite rightly the journalists on the news of the world who very honorable journalists who have been putting out the newspaper under the scrutiny for a long time and with great exclusives and great pride in their newspaper were very sad and baffled by management's de
? edited, by the way, at that time by rebecca brooks. they sent 20 scantily clad women to her office and had loads of photographs everywhere. they described the minister at the time as frumpy, dumpy, fat and ugly. there was humiliation as a form of coercion and then we heard yesterday, gordon brown, the former prime minister, talking about the fact that his disabled son, his son has cystic fibrosis, medical records for his son alleged by gordon brown in the house of commons yesterday, was stolen from a hospital by a criminal that he believes was working for "the sunday times" newspaper. so you have that kind of power. you have the ability to humiliate an mp and the ability to intervene in their personal life and that's why he was so forceful and powerful. i can tell you, andrea, until about three weeks ago, you couldn't count on five fingers the number of politicians who would stand up to rupert murdoch in britain because every single one of them was frightened of his influence. >> of course, gordon brown's little boy frazier is doing very well but it was at birth that that informati
today. we are going to start with david brooks. >> over the past few weeks, washington seemed dysfunctional. public disgust has risen to epic levels. they have been responsible and brave. if you are a democrat, you hate to see domestic cuts. if you are a republican you love revenue increases, even little ones. standing still is not an option. keep your reservations in mind and let the mission continue. okay, new york times the lesser depression by paul krugman. there's an old quotation that always comes to mind when i look at public policy. you do not know, my son, with how little wisdom the world is governed. now that wisdom is on full display of policy elites as both sides bungle the response to economic trauma, ignoring the lessons of history. >> howard dean, does david brooks have it right? are the republicans finally coming or paul krugman, the deficit cuts are only going to extend this small depression? >> i guess it's both and neither. there have been grown ups -- the nice thing is there are grown ups in washington still. they have input. the problem is, before the elec
this committee because they're not british citizens. but their chief executive, rebekah brooks, can be forced to come and answer questions. it's going to be fascinating next tuesday to see who turns up and what they say, and i would imagine this story will just keep rumbling all summer. now as you say, with senator jay rockefeller also getting interested in this in the states as well, this is now not only a u.k. story, it's an international story. it's a u.s. story as well because, of course, rupert murdock has interests all around the place, not just here, he's got "the wall street journal," fox news, "new york post" to name but a few. >> i want to ask you this. you mentioned rupert murdock and his son not being british citizens can't be forced to testify before parliament. what is the outcome if they do? in the united states we have a lot of people called to testify before congress, subpoenaed, they have to go. but it's unclear unless you lie to congress, what the consequences are of that. are there really consequences to this editor in chief being called before parliament? >> well, it's tr
in -- that what we'll kick off with with our power panel. brook goldstein is with us and susan silivik is ceo and cofounder of it's your biz.com. what do you think when you hear diminishing numbers of people in this country think i'm probably not going to get there. >> it sickens me because being an entrepreneur, it's the quintessential american dream. here is what's happening. small businesses are saying we sat by and watched as big government bailed out big business. but they have done nothing to us. while big government is attached to wall street, they disconnected from main street. that american dream is diminishing. i hear from lots of small business owners. we are ready to throw in the towel and calm it quits. martha: you watch generations of businesses that built up and such an incredible opportunity. they seem to appeal to they won't achieve the same level of success and feel their children will not succeed. >> look back at a poll in may have you had youth staying for the first time that they will not be better off than their parents. that's astonishing to me to see that and think abo
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)